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Preventable Deaths in Montana: Unintentional Injury Deaths by County

preventable deaths injury thUnintentional injury is the leading cause of death among people aged 1-44 years and the rate has been steadily increasing in Montana since 1994. Of deaths due to unintentional injury in Montana, the majority are related to motor vehicle crashes, falls, and poisonings. The Montana Injury Prevention Program (MIPP) has chosen to focus on these priority areas. This report describes the rate of premature death due to unintentional injury at the county level. Comparing these rates across the state allows communities to identify potentially preventable deaths in their area and take steps to reduce the burden of unintentional injury for their population.

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Montana’s Focus on Autism License Plate

DEAP autism license plateBeginning this year, Montana has an autism-focused license plate. The proceeds benefit the Developmental Educational Assistance Program (DEAP) in Miles City, MT. For more information, contact Kim Beaner at 406-234-6034 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This plate benefits DEAP ($20 per plate), a not for profit organization providing services individuals with autism and their caregivers including public awareness and education, evaluation and diagnosis and applied behavioral intervention.

UM Trainee with a Lifelong Commitment to People with Disabilities

Jenn Banna is a UM parent leadership trainee in the Utah Regional Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (URLEND) program. URLEND works with UM’s Rural Institute and other universities to develop leaders who can improve health and educational outcomes for children and youth with disabilities and their families. Jenn knows disability well. In high school she provided respite care to people with disabilities and her father was the first Director of the Child Development Center at Fort Missoula. She has had two children with disabilities. One passed away, and her fourth child was born with PittHopkins Syndrome.

In recent years, with PLUK, Inc. (Montana’s Parent Training and Information Center for families who have a child with a disability) and the Mountain States Genetics Regional Collaborative, Jenn helped support families with children who have atypical medical, behavioral, or basic needs. This past year she was appointed to the Montana Family Support Services Advisory Council (FSSAC) by Governor Steve Bullock.

Continue reading about Jenn Banna