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UM's Rural Institute Reaches Out to Families in Southwest Montana

Milestone Moments booklet cover“500 ‘Milestones’ booklets and 500 ‘Track Your Child’s Developmental Milestones’ brochures,” was the request from staff of Family Outreach Region IV, Inc., a private non-profit agency providing home-based education and support services to individuals throughout southwest Montana who have disabilities or developmental delays.

Family Outreach, Inc. staff teach families and friends how to teach skills to children and adults with special needs. Staff recognized immediately the benefit of the Learn the Signs. Act Early resources, Milestones Moments and Track Your Child’s Developmental Milestones. “We put a copy of the booklet and brochure in every family orientation packet,” says Jackie Mohler, a program manager. “When our staff make home visits, they use the booklets as a starting place for discussion with parents and families. The milestones are a way for us to talk about their child’s development in a non-threatening way,” she adds.

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Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) Technical Assistance Center

Pre ETS TACA new resource is now available for transition services in the state of Montana. Through a contract with Montana Vocational Rehabilitation and Blind Services, the Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) Technical Assistance Center will provide technical assistance to schools, Tribes, and VRBS staff regarding Pre-ETS for high school students.
 
Students with disabilities are eligible for Pre-ETS if they receive special education services from the high school, have a Section 504 Plan from the high school, or have any disability recognized and not served through the high school. The student may receive Pre-ETS services beginning the academic year in which the student turns sixteen years of age and ending when the student is no longer enrolled in high school for reasons such as graduation, dropping out, or exiting high school for any reason.

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Planning Your Transition from Pediatric to Adult Health Care: A Workbook to Help You Take Charge of Your Health

In December 2013, we created this workbook for Montanans under age 30 living with special health care needs and/or a disability. It offers information about preparing for the transition from pediatric to adult health care, choosing medical providers, paying for services, taking responsibility for one’s own health, and much more. The workbook is intended to be used as a guide for conversations between youth, their parents, and their medical providers.

Printed copies of the workbook were distributed in the spring and summer of 2014. It is also available on the Transition and Employment Projects website (http://ruralinstitute.umt.edu/transition/articles.asp).

We are preparing to update and revise the workbook and seek your input on what needs to be changed, added, removed, kept exactly “as is,” etc. We estimate the survey will take 10-20 minutes to complete. You may print out and write your answers on the hard copy survey, or complete the survey online at: http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/2587418/Health-Care-Transition-Guide-Customer-Satisfaction-Survey

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RIIC longest-serving staff member retires after 32 years of service

The longest-serving staff member of the Rural Institute for Inclusive Communities recently retired after 32 years of service. We wanted to take advantage of Joyce’s institutional knowledge. In her own words, we asked her to record her memories of the early days.

I started at the Montana University Affiliated Program Satellite in October 1978 in Helena (Office of the Commissioner of Higher Education) and was the second staff to be hired, after the Director. 

After touring the 3 state’s universities, Missoula was selected to be home for the Rural Institute.  In June 1979, the four-member staff moved to Missoula and shared a rental house near the university. 

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Improving life for rural Americans with disabilities

University of Montana Rural Institute

RIIC PartnershipMap 250

Rural Institute Annual Report 2017Rural Institute (RI) is committed to creating better lives for rural people with disabilities and their families. With innovative services, training and research, RI strives to improve independence and participation of people with disabilities in everyday activities and all aspects of the community.

 

The Rural Institute is one of 67 University Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), funded by the U.S. Administration for Community Living.The national enrollment for the All of Us Research Program is open now!


CDC Gov statistic for disability

22.5% of adults in the U.S. have some type of disability
21.4% of adults in Montana have some type of disability

https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/disabilityandhealth/impacts/montana.html


The national enrollment for the All of Us Research Program is open now!

All of Us Research Program is a historic, longitudinal effort to gather data from one million or more people living in the United States to accelerate research and improve health. By taking into account individual differences in lifestyle, socioeconomics, environment, and biology, researchers will uncover paths toward delivering precision medicine –or individualized prevention, treatment, and care –for all of us. This Research Program aims to recruit 1 million or more volunteers and oversample communities that have been underrepresented in research to make the program the largest, most diverse resource of its kind. The national enrollment for All of Us Research Project is open now!

All eligible adults who live in the United States can join the All of Us Research Program. People of every race, ethnicity, sex, gender, disability, and sexual orientation are welcome.

If you decide to join the All of Us Research Program, we will ask you to share different kinds of information. We will ask you basic information like your name and where you live. We will ask you questions about your health, family, home, and work. If you have an electronic health record, we may ask for access. We may ask you to go to a local clinic or drug store for a free appointment with us. At this appointment, we will collect basic physical measurements, including your height, weight, and hip and waist measurements, as well as your blood pressure and heart rate. We might ask you to give samples, like blood or urine, at the appointment.

To join All of Us Research Project or to subscribe for more information, please visit joinallofus.org.

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